Cloud of Cards. Early pictures from the final artifacts, a photo shoot with Daniela & Tonatiuh

Photography by Daniela & Tonatiuh.

Design by Léa Pereyre, Lucien Langton and Patrick Keller

I&IC’s public survey of 356 links related to “Clouds” on Pinboard – last updated 03.2017

Along the design research, we are going through many different types of references that we don’t necessarily post or document on the blog. We usually only post about the ones that we consider relevant to the research process, which doesn’t mean the other ones are not interesting. We’ve just decided not to dig deeper into them at some point, or to keep some of them for later.

Yet, this is a consistent amount of survey that we are leaving on the side of the road and that could possibly be useful for similar or later researches. At least a good starting point… That’s why we’ve created this i&ic_designresearch tag on Pinboard.

Interestingly, some new thematics emerged along the way within these links, like for example on the technological branch, the combination of personal cloud based services, peer to peer protocols and blockchains that were not on the radar when we started our research.

 

I&IC Workshop #5 at ECAL, tips: RaspberryPi’s and the GrovePi+

By Monday, November 16, 2015 Tags: 0120, ECAL, Hardware, Tools Permalink 0

If you are not familiar with the Raspberry Pi and remote access, a previous post was written here and here.

 

School’s specials:

Your RaspberryPi is preconfigured with an updated version of wheezy (2015.03.20_Dexter_Industries_wheezy.img) specifically designed to work with the GrovePi+.

If during the week you need to re-run updates just type in the following:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

Note also that you can access a few tutorials and “how to’s” on the same Dexter Industries website. “Get Started with the Grove Pi” and “Example Projects” have been already linked on our resources section out here.

However beware, the school network might not let you do this, you might have to choose another network for that (like your phone’s).

 

The easiest way to access your Pi is via VNC with an Ethernet connection. First you need to install VNC viewer for your mac. During the installation process just check install viewer, no need to install server.

Once done and your Raspberry booted, you should be able to VNC into it through Ethernet connection:
169.254.0.2:5901

Note that :5901 indicates to connect to shared-screen number 1, if you configure other screens the number 2 would be :5902, and so on.

Once connected, to configure wifi go to wpa_gui on your desktop and configure the wifi network details (with your wifi-dongle plugged in ;).

Your RaspberryPi was configured for remote access, to ssh it via Ethernet (if it doesn’t work, unplug your wifi  dongle and plug it back in once done):
ssh pi@169.254.0.2

 

Once connected you can check if you have an active connection:
ping www.google.com

If you don’t, you can check if you Raspberry Pi is at least scanning the right networks:
sudo wpa_cli scan && sleep 5 && wpa_cli scan_results

For more wifi troubleshooting follow this guide

 

To set screens, or kill them via the command line there are these commands:

sudo tightvncserver :1
sudo tightvncserver -kill :1

If for some reason you need to change the static IP set for ethernet connection, you can edit it via a simple card reader by editing the IP set in cmdline.txt situated in the root folder of your card. (if it doesn’t work, check if your computer has a dynamically allocated IP for ethernet connection, in this case we’ll check it out together)

As the week goes on I’ll update this post with new ressources. Enjoy!

Raspberry Pi and GrovePi, “Get Started” and other resources

Note: in the context of previous workshop (Networked Data Objects with M. Plummer-Fernandez a.k.a #algopop), we’ve been working with a combination of Raspberri Pi’s and sensors. We will continue with this hardware choice, even increase it during a coming exhibition at H3K, Poetics and Politics of Data. But for this, we will switch to the GrovePi solution when it comes to sensors, which will ease the prototyping part.

Here is a good resource about Pi’s and Grove sensors on Dexter Industries’ website.

World Brain: a journey through data centers

By Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Tags: 0098, A, Data, Datacenter, Hardware, Infrastructure Permalink 1

World Brain” by Stéphane Degoutin and Gwenola Wagon (2015)

 

wherewelive

World Brain proposes a stroll through motley folkloric tales : data centers, animal magnetism, the Internet as a myth, the inner lives of rats, how to gather a network of researchers in the forest, how to survive in the wild using Wikipedia, how to connect cats and stones…
The world we live in often resembles a Borgesian story. Indeed, if one wanted to write a sequel to Borges’ Fictions, he could do it simply by putting together press articles.
The World Brain is made out mostly of found materials : videos downloaded on Youtube, images, scientific or pseudo scientific reports, news feeds… [...] World Brain takes the viewer through a journey inside the physical places by which the Internet transits: submarine cables, data centers, satellites. The film adopts the point of view of the data. The audience view the world as if they were information, crossing the planet in an instant, copied in an infinite number of instances or, at the contrary, stored in secret places.

 

More projects by S. Degoutin and G. Wagon on their Nogovoyage website.

A few images for a brief history (of computing) time

Note: a aet of images I’ll need for a short introduction to the project.

From mainframe computers to cloud computing, through personal computer and all other initiatives that tried to curve “the way computers go” and provide access to tools to people who were not necessarily computer savvy. Under this perspective (“access to tools”), cloud computing is a new paradigm that takes us away from that of the personal computer. To the point that it brings us back to the time of the mainframe computer (no-access or difficult access to tools)?

If we consider how far the personal computer, combined with the more recent Internet, has changed the ways we interact, work and live, we should certainly pay attention to this new paradigm that is coming and probably work hard to make it “accessible”.

 

00_IBM

A very  short history pdf in 14 images.

Moving clouds: International transportation standards

As a technical starting point of this research Patrick Keller already wrote two posts on hardware standards and measures: The Rack Unit and the EIC /ECIA Standards (other articles including technical overview are the 19 Inch Rack & Rack Mount Cases). Within the same intent of understanding the technical standards and limitations that shape the topologies of data centers we decided to investigate how the racks can be packed, shipped, and gain mobility. The standards for server transportation safety are set by the Rack Transport Stability Team (RTST) guidelines. Of course, custom built server packaging exists based on the international standards. We’ll start by listing them from the smallest to the biggest dimensions. First off, the pallet is the smallest measure. Once installed on pallets, the racks can be disposed in standard 20′ or 40′ shipping containers. The image below depicts different ways of arranging the pallets within the container: